TBR

June TBR | 2018

ToBeRead12:17

I am not sure about you, but the entire time I was creating my TBR for this month I just kept thinking about summer time and reading on the beach. June is the time of year I think about relaxing and when I tend to do most of my reading so this TBR is going to be a bit longer than it has been in the last few. The first book I will admit is a carry over from last month, but the rest are all new.

Divider

In the Days of Rain by Rebecca Stott

In the Days of Rain

I really want to get to this non-fiction book, it seems so interesting.

In the vein of Bad Blood and Why be Happy when you can be Normal?: an enthralling, at times shocking, and deeply personal family memoir of growing up in, and breaking away from, a fundamentalist Christian cult.

‘At university when I made new friends and confidantes, I couldn’t explain how I’d become a teenage mother, or shoplifted books for years, or why I was afraid of the dark and had a compulsion to rescue people, without explaining about the Brethren or the God they made for us, and the Rapture they told us was coming. But then I couldn’t really begin to talk about the Brethren without explaining about my father…’

As Rebecca Stott’s father lay dying he begged her to help him write the memoir he had been struggling with for years. He wanted to tell the story of their family, who, for generations had all been members of a fundamentalist Christian sect. Yet, each time he reached a certain point, he became tangled in a thicket of painful memories and could not go on.

The sect were a closed community who believed the world is ruled by Satan: non-sect books were banned, women were made to wear headscarves and those who disobeyed the rules were punished.

Rebecca was born into the sect, yet, as an intelligent, inquiring child she was always asking dangerous questions. She would discover that her father, an influential preacher, had been asking them too, and that the fault-line between faith and doubt had almost engulfed him. -goodreads.com

Divider

Lying in Wait by Liz Nugent

Lying in Wait

I read Unraveling Oliver by her and I loved it so much. I was so excited when I saw it on Netgalley and then I was so surprised and excited to get approved for the eARC. I have a feeling this is going to be the first one I finish this month.

My husband did not mean to kill Annie Doyle, but the lying tramp deserved it.

On the surface, Lydia Fitzsimons has the perfect life—wife of a respected, successful judge, mother to a beloved son, mistress of a beautiful house in Dublin. That beautiful house, however, holds a secret. And when Lydia’s son, Laurence, discovers its secret, wheels are set in motion that lead to an increasingly claustrophobic and devastatingly dark climax. – goodreads.com

Divider

All Out: The No-Longer-Secret Stories of Queer Teens Throughout the Ages by Saundra Mitchell

All Out: The No-Longer-Secret Stories of Queer Teens Throughout the Ages

The title alone makes me want to read this. Then there is the description!

Take a journey through time and genres and discover a past where queer figures live, love and shape the world around them. Seventeen of the best young adult authors across the queer spectrum have come together to create a collection of beautifully written diverse historical fiction for teens.

From a retelling of Little Red Riding Hood set in war-torn 1870s Mexico featuring a transgender soldier, to two girls falling in love while mourning the death of Kurt Cobain, forbidden love in a sixteenth-century Spanish convent or an asexual girl discovering her identity amid the 1970s roller-disco scene, All Out tells a diverse range of stories across cultures, time periods and identities, shedding light on an area of history often ignored or forgotten. -goodreads.com

Divider

The Wicked Deep by Shea Ernshaw

The Wicked Deep

I got this for my birthday and I read the description and I just want to read it ASAP!

Where, two centuries ago, three sisters were sentenced to death for witchery. Stones were tied to their ankles and they were drowned in the deep waters surrounding the town.

Now, for a brief time each summer, the sisters return, stealing the bodies of three weak-hearted girls so that they may seek their revenge, luring boys into the harbor and pulling them under.

Like many locals, seventeen-year-old Penny Talbot has accepted the fate of the town. But this year, on the eve of the sisters’ return, a boy named Bo Carter arrives; unaware of the danger he has just stumbled into.

Mistrust and lies spread quickly through the salty, rain-soaked streets. The townspeople turn against one another. Penny and Bo suspect each other of hiding secrets. And death comes swiftly to those who cannot resist the call of the sisters.

But only Penny sees what others cannot. And she will be forced to choose: save Bo, or save herself. – goodreads.com

Divider

What are you reading this month?

SignOff12:17

Tumblr Twitter | Instagram | Goodreads

TBR

TBR | EBOOKATHON

ToBeRead12:17Surprise! I am taking part in a readathon taking place from May 27th-June 2nd. I came across a post on Victoria’s blog announcing she is hosting a readathon with Brookesbooknook where all you do is read ebooks that have been piling up on an ereader. Since I have a thing where I always buy discount ebooks and then totally forget about them, I thought it would be perfect. Here is my TBR for the readathon!

Divider

Challenges

  1. Oldest book on your e-reader
  2. Ebook you got for free
  3. Ebook you forgot about
  4. Daily deal impulse buy
  5. Free choice

 

My TBR

It Starts Like This: a collection of poetry by Shelby Leigh

It Starts Like This: a collection of poetry

A powerful poetry and prose collection about the journey through love, loss, healing, and hope. This book is for anyone who loves deeply, has bad days, and searches for happiness in the world around them. It is for those who have been hurt and have the scars to prove they’re still alive. -goodreads.com

Go: A Coming of Age Novel by Kazuki Kaneshiro translated by Takami Nieda

Go: A Coming of Age Novel

As a Korean student in a Japanese high school, Sugihara has had to defend himself against all kinds of bullies. But nothing could have prepared him for the heartache he feels when he falls hopelessly in love with a Japanese girl named Sakurai. Immersed in their shared love for classical music and foreign movies, the two gradually grow closer and closer.

One night, after being hit by personal tragedy, Sugihara reveals to Sakurai that he is not Japanese—as his name might indicate.

Torn between a chance at self-discovery that he’s ready to seize and the prejudices of others that he can’t control, Sugihara must decide who he wants to be and where he wants to go next. Will Sakurai be able to confront her own bias and accompany him on his journey? -goodreads.com

Texts from Jane Eyre: And Other Conversations with Your Favorite Literary Characters by Mallory Ortberg

Texts from Jane Eyre: And Other Conversations with Your Favorite Literary Characters

Hilariously imagined text conversations—the passive aggressive, the clever, and the strange—from classic and modern literary figures, from Scarlett O’Hara to Jessica Wakefield.

Mallory Ortberg, the co-creator of the cult-favorite website The Toast, presents this whimsical collection of hysterical text conversations from your favorite literary characters. Everyone knows that if Scarlett O’Hara had an unlimited text-and-data plan, she’d constantly try to tempt Ashley away from Melanie with suggestive messages. If Mr. Rochester could text Jane Eyre, his ardent missives would obviously be in all-caps. And Daisy Buchanan would not only text while driving, she’d text you to pick her up after she totaled her car. Based on the popular web-feature, Texts from Jane Eyre is a witty, irreverent mashup that brings the characters from your favorite books into the twenty-first century. -goodreads.com

Guardians of the Galaxy, Vol. 1: Cosmic Avengers by Brian Michael Bendis, Steve McNiven, Yves Bigerel, Michael Avon Oeming

Guardians of the Galaxy, Vol. 1: Cosmic Avengers

The Guardians of the Galaxy are imposing a new rule: Earth is off limits! What has made this world so important? Join Star-Lord, Groot, Rocket Raccoon, Iron Man and more as they fight the foes no single planet’s heroes could withstand! -goodreads.com

The Death of Mrs. Westaway by Ruth Ware

The Death of Mrs. Westaway

On a day that begins like any other, Hal receives a mysterious letter bequeathing her a substantial inheritance. She realizes very quickly that the letter was sent to the wrong person—but also that the cold-reading skills she’s honed as a tarot card reader might help her claim the money.

Soon, Hal finds herself at the funeral of the deceased…where it dawns on her that there is something very, very wrong about this strange situation and the inheritance at the center of it.

Full of spellbinding menace and told in Ruth Ware’s signature suspenseful style, this is an unputdownable thriller from the Agatha Christie of our time. -goodreads.com

Divider

Are you taking part in the readathon?

What ebook have you ben putting off?

SignOff12:17

Tumblr Twitter | Instagram | Goodreads

TBR

May TBR | 2018

ToBeRead12:17

This month will be filled with a lot of historical fiction and non-fiction books. But, there will also be a light buddy read that I am looking forward to as well. I think there will be a good balance and I am excited to get to all of these books. Also, I wanted to write this here, because if you don’t write it, it wont happen. I am going to be doing the Read 5 to Buy 1 challenge. As of late my book buying is a bit out of hand, but that will not count the books I will be getting for my birthday. Wish me luck with my challenge! Here are the books I am planning on reading this month.

Divider

In the Days of Rain by Rebecca Stott

In the Days of Rain

I really want to get to this non-fiction book, it seems so interesting.

In the vein of Bad Blood and Why be Happy when you can be Normal?: an enthralling, at times shocking, and deeply personal family memoir of growing up in, and breaking away from, a fundamentalist Christian cult.

‘At university when I made new friends and confidantes, I couldn’t explain how I’d become a teenage mother, or shoplifted books for years, or why I was afraid of the dark and had a compulsion to rescue people, without explaining about the Brethren or the God they made for us, and the Rapture they told us was coming. But then I couldn’t really begin to talk about the Brethren without explaining about my father…’

As Rebecca Stott’s father lay dying he begged her to help him write the memoir he had been struggling with for years. He wanted to tell the story of their family, who, for generations had all been members of a fundamentalist Christian sect. Yet, each time he reached a certain point, he became tangled in a thicket of painful memories and could not go on.

The sect were a closed community who believed the world is ruled by Satan: non-sect books were banned, women were made to wear headscarves and those who disobeyed the rules were punished.

Rebecca was born into the sect, yet, as an intelligent, inquiring child she was always asking dangerous questions. She would discover that her father, an influential preacher, had been asking them too, and that the fault-line between faith and doubt had almost engulfed him. -goodreads.com

DividerFingerprints of Previous Owners by Rebecca Entel

Fingerprints of Previous Owners

I meant to read this a few months ago, but a few things sadly got in the way of me reading this. I am determined to read this amazing sounds independent book.

At a Caribbean resort built atop a former slave plantation, Myrna works as a maid by day; by night she trespasses on the resort’s overgrown inland property, secretly excavating the plantation ruins that her island community refuses to acknowledge. Rapt by the crumbling walls of the once slave-owner’s estate, she explores the unspoken history of the plantation—a site where her ancestors once worked the land, but which the resort now uses as a lookout point for tourists.

When Myrna discovers a book detailing the experiences of slaves, who still share a last name with the majority of the islanders, her investigation becomes deeply personal, extending to her neighbors and friends, and explaining her mother’s self-imposed silence and father’s disappearance. A new generation begins to speak about the past just as racial tensions erupt between the resort and the local island community when an African-American tourist at the resort is brutally attacked.

Suffused with the sun-drenched beauty of the Caribbean, Fingerprints of Previous Owners is a powerful novel of hope and recovery in the wake of devastating trauma. In her soulful and timely debut, Entel explores what it means to colonize and be colonized, to trespass and be trespassed upon, to be wounded and to heal. -goodreads.com

DividerCirce by Madeline Miller

Circe

This was my April Book of the Month pick and I really want to get to it this month. It is one of the most interesting ones I have gotten from them. I always loved the myths of gods and reading stories about witches.

In the house of Helios, god of the sun and mightiest of the Titans, a daughter is born. But Circe is a strange child–not powerful, like her father, nor viciously alluring like her mother. Turning to the world of mortals for companionship, she discovers that she does possess power–the power of witchcraft, which can transform rivals into monsters and menace the gods themselves.

Threatened, Zeus banishes her to a deserted island, where she hones her occult craft, tames wild beasts and crosses paths with many of the most famous figures in all of mythology, including the Minotaur, Daedalus and his doomed son Icarus, the murderous Medea, and, of course, wily Odysseus.

But there is danger, too, for a woman who stands alone, and Circe unwittingly draws the wrath of both men and gods, ultimately finding herself pitted against one of the most terrifying and vengeful of the Olympians. To protect what she loves most, Circe must summon all her strength and choose, once and for all, whether she belongs with the gods she is born from, or the mortals she has come to love. -goodreads.com

 

DividerIrena’s Children by Tilar J. Mazzeo

Irena's Children: The Extraordinary Story of the Woman Who Saved 2,500 Children from the Warsaw Ghetto

I picked up this non-fiction a few months ago and I really want to read it. I have been putting it off for who knows what reason, but this month I am determined to read it.

In 1942, one young social worker, Irena Sendler, was granted access to the Warsaw ghetto as a public health specialist. While there, she reached out to the trapped Jewish families, going from door to door and asking the parents to trust her with their young children. She started smuggling them out of the walled district, convincing her friends and neighbors to hide them. Driven to extreme measures and with the help of a network of local tradesmen, ghetto residents, and her star-crossed lover in the Jewish resistance, Irena ultimately smuggled thousands of children past the Nazis. She made dangerous trips through the city’s sewers, hid children in coffins, snuck them under overcoats at checkpoints, and slipped them through secret passages in abandoned buildings.

But Irena did something even more astonishing at immense personal risk: she kept secret lists buried in bottles under an old apple tree in a friend’s back garden. On them were the names and true identities of those Jewish children, recorded with the hope that their relatives could find them after the war. She could not have known that more than ninety percent of their families would perish. -goodreads.com

DividerEvery Exquisite Thing by Matthew Quick

Every Exquisite Thing

This month I will be reading this book with Amy from Tomes with Tea, Regina from Bookish in Bed and  Jenna from J.K. I’m Exploring! I am very much looking forward to this.

Nanette O’Hare has played the quintessential privileged star athlete and straight-A student for as long as she can remember. But when a beloved teacher gives her his worn copy of The Bubblegum Reaper–a mysterious, out-of-print cult classic–the rebel within Nanette awakens.

As the new and outspoken Nanette attempts to insert her true self into the world with wild abandon, she learns that rebellion can sometimes come at a high price…and with devastating consequences. -goodreads.com

Divider

What are you reading this month?

SignOff12:17

Tumblr Twitter | Instagram | Goodreads

TBR

TBR | Dewey’s 24 Hour #readathon May 2018

ToBeRead12:17

Hello all this is just a quick announcement that I am going to take part in the Dewey’s 24 hour readathon. I posted a picture of my TBR for tomorrow on my instagram, but I wanted to share it here as well. Wish me luck!

P.S. all updates will be posted on my twitter account so if you are interested follow me here.

DividerWould you ever take part in a 24 hour readthon?

SignOff12:17

Tumblr Twitter | Instagram | Goodreads

TBR

April TBR | 2018

ToBeRead12:17

Happy April everyone! This month I think I am going to be reading a lot. I am not sure if it is because I read so much in March, but I just have a good feeling about April. This month I am buddy reading two different books, one a non-fiction and the other a thriller. I am also finishing up a non-fiction and a starting a fantasy series. I also am taking part in the Magical Readathon: OWLs Exams. I made a separate TBR a few days ago and explained the readathon a little bit as well. You can find that here: TBR | Magical Readathon OWLs Exams.

Divider

The Wicked Boy: The Mystery of a Victorian Child Murderer by Kate Summerscale

The Wicked Boy: The Mystery of a Victorian Child Murderer

This month I will finish  reading The Wicked Boy with Amy from Tomes with Tea, Regina from Bookish in Bed and  Jenna from J.K. I’m Exploring!

Early in the morning of Monday 8 July 1895, thirteen-year-old Robert Coombes and his twelve-year-old brother Nattie set out from their small, yellow-brick terraced house in East London to watch a cricket match at Lord’s. Their father had gone to sea the previous Friday, the boys told their neighbours, and their mother was visiting her family in Liverpool. Over the next ten days Robert and Nattie spent extravagantly, pawning their parents’ valuables to fund trips to the theatre and the seaside. But as the sun beat down on the Coombes house, a strange smell began to emanate from the building. When the police were finally called to investigate, the discovery they made sent the press into a frenzy of horror and alarm, and Robert and Nattie were swept up in a criminal trial that echoed the outrageous plots of the ‘penny dreadful’ novels that Robert loved to read. In The Wicked Boy, Kate Summerscale has uncovered a fascinating true story of murder and morality – it is not just a meticulous examination of a shocking Victorian case, but also a compelling account of its aftermath, and of man’s capacity to overcome the past.

  • goodreads.com

Divider

Unraveling Oliver by Liz Nugent

Unraveling Oliver

This is another buddy read with Amy from Tomes with Tea, Regina from Bookish in Bed and  Jenna from J.K. I’m Exploring. What can I say, we love reading and discussing books with one another?

I expected more of a reaction the first time I hit her.”

So begins Liz Nugent’s astonishing debut novel—a chilling, elegantly crafted, and psychologically astute exploration of the nature of evil.

Oliver Ryan, handsome, charismatic, and successful, has long been married to his devoted wife, Alice. Together they write and illustrate award-winning children’s books; their life together one of enviable privilege and ease—until, one evening after a delightful dinner, Oliver delivers a blow to Alice that renders her unconscious, and subsequently beats her into a coma.

In the aftermath of such an unthinkable event, as Alice hovers between life and death, the couple’s friends, neighbors, and acquaintances try to understand what could have driven Oliver to commit such a horrific act. As his story unfolds, layers are peeled away to reveal a life of shame, envy, deception, and masterful manipulation.

With its alternating points of view and deft prose, Unraveling Oliver is “a page-turning, one-sitting read from a brand new master of psychological suspense” (Sunday Independent) that details how an ordinary man can transform into a sociopath.

  • goodreads.com

Divider

Every Heart a Doorway by Seanan McGuire

Every Heart a Doorway (Wayward Children, #1)

I have been interested in starting this series for a long time now and I think it is finally time. I have heard awesome things about this series and what I love most is that these books are so short. They are a great break in-between the larger books I read.

Eleanor West’s Home for Wayward Children
No Solicitations
No Visitors
No Quests

Children have always disappeared under the right conditions; slipping through the shadows under a bed or at the back of a wardrobe, tumbling down rabbit holes and into old wells, and emerging somewhere… else.

But magical lands have little need for used-up miracle children.

Nancy tumbled once, but now she’s back. The things she’s experienced… they change a person. The children under Miss West’s care understand all too well. And each of them is seeking a way back to their own fantasy world.

But Nancy’s arrival marks a change at the Home. There’s a darkness just around each corner, and when tragedy strikes, it’s up to Nancy and her new-found schoolmates to get to the heart of the matter.

No matter the cost.

  • goodreads.com

Divider

Eleanor Roosevelt: Vol 2, The Defining Years, 1933-38 by Blanche Wiesen Cook

Eleanor Roosevelt: Vol 2, The Defining Years, 1933-38

I started this non-fiction account of Eleanor Roosevelt last month and I would like to finish it this month. This is the second book in a trilogy written by Cook, I am hoping it lives up to the first one. Fingers crossed!

Historians, politicians, feminists, critics, and reviewers everywhere have praised Blanche Wiesen Cook’s monumental Eleanor Roosevelt as the definitive portrait of this towering female figure of the twentieth century. Now in her long-awaited, majestic second volume, Cook takes readers through the tumultuous era of the Great Depression, the New Deal, and the gathering storms of World War II, the years of the Roosevelts’ greatest challenges and finest achievements. In her remarkably engaging narrative, Cook gives us the complete Eleanor Roosevelt— an adventurous, romantic woman, a devoted wife and mother, and a visionary policymaker and social activist who often took unpopular stands, counter to her husband’s policies, especially on issues such as racial justice and women’s rights. A biography of scholarship and daring, it is a book for all readers of American history.

  • goodreads.com

Divider

What are you reading this month?

SignOff12:17

Tumblr Twitter | Instagram | Goodreads

 

TBR

TBR | Magical Readathon OWLs Exams

ToBeRead12:17So I have to admit I heard about this readathon a day before it started otherwise I would have posted about it sooner. But, the moment I heard about it I knew I needed to take part in it. This a readthon hosted by Book Roast over on youtube. I have to say she is very organized and very knowledgable.

Highlights:

  • April 2nd- April 29th
  • To get an O you need to sit and pass 5 OWL exams.
  • No doubling up on challenges
  • Comic books, manga, audiobook, and graphic novels do count
  • Use #owlsreadathon2018

Announcement Video:

READATHON LETTER (with challenges) https://drive.google.com/open?id=1LOa…DividerMy Career Path | OWLs I Need to Pass

So as I mentioned earlier she is very knowledgable. If you go to the readathon twitter page she has a whole thread dedicated to explaining the OWLs needed for the profession you would like. I decided I would like to be a Potioneer. Here are the required OWLs, but if you noticed I need 5 to get an O so I will be picking another OWL that is not required.

Divider

My TBR

Required OWLs

  • Potions – Read a book about or with Alchemy | The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho
  • Herbology – Read a book with a nature related word in the title | The Honey Farm by Harriet Alida Lye
  • Charms – Read a fantasy book | Every Heart a Doorway by Seanan McGuire
  • Arithmancy – Read a book with a number in the title or on the cover | The Lying Game by Ruth Ware

Bonus OWL

Divider

Are you taking part in the readathon? What career would you have if you lived in the Harry Potter universe?

SignOff12:17

Tumblr Twitter | Instagram | Goodreads

TBR

March TBR | 2018

ToBeRead12:17

Happy March everyone! I hope it has started off on a good foot. This month I am very excited to read a few of the books off of my shelf. Especially with #IndieAthon happening all month and the #CroneBookClub happening on March 18th! Click the link for more details on all the fun.

Divider

Fingerprints of Previous Owners by Rebecca Entel

My #IndieAThon Pick!

Fingerprints of Previous Owners

At a Caribbean resort built atop a former slave plantation, Myrna works as a maid by day; by night she trespasses on the resort’s overgrown inland property, secretly excavating the plantation ruins that her island community refuses to acknowledge. Rapt by the crumbling walls of the once slave-owner’s estate, she explores the unspoken history of the plantation—a site where her ancestors once worked the land, but which the resort now uses as a lookout point for tourists.

When Myrna discovers a book detailing the experiences of slaves, who still share a last name with the majority of the islanders, her investigation becomes deeply personal, extending to her neighbors and friends, and explaining her mother’s self-imposed silence and father’s disappearance. A new generation begins to speak about the past just as racial tensions erupt between the resort and the local island community when an African-American tourist at the resort is brutally attacked.

Suffused with the sun-drenched beauty of the Caribbean, Fingerprints of Previous Owners is a powerful novel of hope and recovery in the wake of devastating trauma. In her soulful and timely debut, Entel explores what it means to colonize and be colonized, to trespass and be trespassed upon, to be wounded and to heal.

-goodreads.com

Divider

The Fandom by Anna Day

This is the #CroneBookClub pick!

18302455

They can’t wait to meet the fandom of mega movie, The Gallows Dance. What they’re not expecting is to be catapulted by freak accident into their favourite world – for real. Fuelled by love, guilt and fear, can the friends put the plot back on track and get out? The fate of the story is in their hands …

A fast-paced, genre-flipping YA fantasy adventure from a brand new author, writing in homage to the best YA fiction.

-goodreads.com

 

 

Divider

Americanah by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

I am going to continue reading this amazing book.

18302455

As teenagers in Lagos, Ifemelu and Obinze fall in love. Their Nigeria is under military dictatorship, and people are fleeing the country if they can. The self-assured Ifemelu departs for America. There she suffers defeats and triumphs, finds and loses relationships, all the while feeling the weight of something she never thought of back home: race. Obinze had hoped to join her, but post-9/11 America will not let him in, and he plunges into a dangerous, undocumented life in London.

Thirteen years later, Obinze is a wealthy man in a newly democratic Nigeria, while Ifemelu has achieved success as a blogger. But after so long apart and so many changes, will they find the courage to meet again, face to face?

Fearless, gripping, spanning three continents and numerous lives, Americanah is a richly told story of love and expectation set in today’s globalized world.

-goodreads.com

 

Divider

Christine by Stephen King

A continuation from February as well.

Christine

It’s love at first sight for high school student Arnie Cunningham when he and his best friend Dennis Guilder spot the dilapidated 1958 red-and-white Plymouth Fury for sale—dubbed “Christine” by its original cantankerous owner—rusting away on a front lawn of their suburban Pennsylvania neighborhood. Dennis knows that Arnie’s never had much luck in the looks or popularity department, or really taken an interest in owning a car . . . but Christine quickly changes all that. Arnie suddenly has the newfound confidence to stick up for himself, going as far as dating the most beautiful girl at Libertyville High—transfer student Leigh Cabot—even as a mysteriously restored Christine systematically and terrifyingly consumes every aspect of Arnie’s life. Dennis and Leigh soon realize that they must uncover the awful truth behind a car with a horrifying and murderous history. Hell hath no fury like a woman scorned, and heaven help anyone who gets in Christine’s way…

-goodreads.com

Divider

The Wicked Boy: The Mystery of a Victorian Child Murderer by Kate Summerscale

The Wicked Boy: The Mystery of a Victorian Child MurdererThis month I am reading The Wicked Boy with Amy from Tomes with Tea, Regina from Bookish in Bed and  Jenna from J.K. I’m Exploring!

Early in the morning of Monday 8 July 1895, thirteen-year-old Robert Coombes and his twelve-year-old brother Nattie set out from their small, yellow-brick terraced house in East London to watch a cricket match at Lord’s. Their father had gone to sea the previous Friday, the boys told their neighbours, and their mother was visiting her family in Liverpool. Over the next ten days Robert and Nattie spent extravagantly, pawning their parents’ valuables to fund trips to the theatre and the seaside. But as the sun beat down on the Coombes house, a strange smell began to emanate from the building. When the police were finally called to investigate, the discovery they made sent the press into a frenzy of horror and alarm, and Robert and Nattie were swept up in a criminal trial that echoed the outrageous plots of the ‘penny dreadful’ novels that Robert loved to read. In The Wicked Boy, Kate Summerscale has uncovered a fascinating true story of murder and morality – it is not just a meticulous examination of a shocking Victorian case, but also a compelling account of its aftermath, and of man’s capacity to overcome the past.

DividerWhile I know I am going to be reading more than 5 books, well hoping I read more than 5 books these are the main books I would like to finish this month. I wish you all the best in March and I hope you read some awesome books!

What is an Indie book you loved?

SignOff12:17

Tumblr Twitter | Instagram | Goodreads

TBR

February TBR | 2018

ToBeRead12:17

This month since it is a mere 28 days, I am making my TBR very short. There is also a book I know I am going to read, but I must keep it a secret. Don’t be mad, but you will learn all about it soon. I tried something new recently and I cannot wait to share it with you.

The Secret History by Donna Tartt

18302455

My buddy read I am participating in is continuing into February, but can I just say that this books is amazing? Thanks again Amy from Tomes with Tea, Regina from Bookish in Bed and  Jenna from J.K. I’m Exploring! for reading this book with me. It has been so much fun.

Under the influence of their charismatic classics professor, a group of clever, eccentric misfits at an elite New England college discover a way of thinking and living that is a world away from the humdrum existence of their contemporaries. But when they go beyond the boundaries of normal morality they slip gradually from obsession to corruption and betrayal, and at last – inexorably – into evil.

Don’t Forget Me by Victoria Stevens

18302455

This comes out February 13th, I received an ARC to review so I plan on getting to this and finishing it the first week of February. From the description I am very excited to pick it up and get to it.

Seventeen-year-old Hazel Clarke is no stranger to heartbreaks, and being sent to live with a father she’s never met is the latest in a string of them. Even the beauty of eastern Australia isn’t enough to take her mind off her mother and the life she had to leave behind in England. But when Hazel meets the friendly, kindhearted Red and his elusive twin, Luca, she begins the slow process of piecing together a new life—and realizes she isn’t the only one struggling with loss. As friendships deepen and love finds its way in, Hazel also learns that when you truly love someone, they are always in your heart.

This sparkling debut novel is a touching testament to coming of age, falling in love, and finding home in unexpected places.

The Fandom by Anna Day

18302455

This month I plan on reading The Fandom to get ready for the first ever #CroneBookClub. For more information please go to Jenn’s post with all the details: Crone Bloggers Book Club.

They can’t wait to meet the fandom of mega movie, The Gallows Dance. What they’re not expecting is to be catapulted by freak accident into their favourite world – for real. Fuelled by love, guilt and fear, can the friends put the plot back on track and get out? The fate of the story is in their hands …

A fast-paced, genre-flipping YA fantasy adventure from a brand new author, writing in homage to the best YA fiction.

SignOff12:17

Tumblr Twitter | Instagram | Goodreads

TBR

January TBR | 2018

ToBeRead12:17

Hello January! I love setting my TBR for the first month out of the year. I feel like it is going to set the tone for the following months. I am excited about each and every one of these books. If you have read any of these books let me know what you thoughts. Without anymore delay here is my January TBR!

Lisey’s Story by Stephen King

18302455

Lisey Landon lost her husband Scott two years ago, after a twenty-five-year marriage of profound, sometimes frightening intimacy. Scott was a celebrated, award-winning, novelist. And a complex man. Lisey knew there was a dark place where her husband ventured to face his demons. Boo’ya Moon is what Scott called it; a realm that both terrified and healed him, that could eat him alive or give him the ideas he needed to write and live. Now, it’s Lisey’s turn to face her husband’s demons. And what begins as a widow’s effort to sort through her husband’s effects, becomes a perilous journey into the heart of darkness

Irena’s Children by Tilar J. Mazzeo

18302455

In 1942, one young social worker, Irena Sendler, was granted access to the Warsaw ghetto as a public health specialist. While she was there, she began to understand the fate that awaited the Jewish families who were unable to leave. Soon she reached out to the trapped families, going from door to door and asking them to trust her with their young children. Driven to extreme measures and with the help of a network of local tradesmen, ghetto residents, and her star-crossed lover in the Jewish resistance, Irena ultimately smuggled thousands of children past the Nazis. She made dangerous trips through the city’s sewers, hid children in coffins, snuck them under overcoats at checkpoints, and slipped them through secret passages in abandoned buildings.

But Irena did something even more astonishing at immense personal risk: she kept a secret list buried in bottles under an old apple tree in a friend’s back garden. On it were the names and true identities of these Jewish children, recorded so their families could find them after the war. She could not know that more than ninety percent of their families would perish.

Murder on the Orient Express by Agatha Christie

18302455

Just after midnight, the famous Orient Express is stopped in its tracks by a snowdrift. By morning, the millionaire Samuel Edward Ratchett lies dead in his compartment, stabbed a dozen times, his door locked from the inside. Without a shred of doubt, one of his fellow passengers is the murderer.

Isolated by the storm, detective Hercule Poirot must find the killer among a dozen of the dead man’s enemies, before the murderer decides to strike again.

The Secret History by Donna Tartt

18302455

I am participating in a buddy read of The Secret History by Donna Tartt with Amy from Tomes with Tea, Regina from Bookish in Bed and last but not least Jenna from J.K. I’m Exploring!  Check them out, they are so kind and have awesome blogs.

Under the influence of their charismatic classics professor, a group of clever, eccentric misfits at an elite New England college discover a way of thinking and living that is a world away from the humdrum existence of their contemporaries. But when they go beyond the boundaries of normal morality they slip gradually from obsession to corruption and betrayal, and at last – inexorably – into evil.


I know my TBR is a bit short, but I wanted to keep the pressure off and leave room for myself to pick books based upon my mood. I have learned over the past year or so that sticking to longer TBRs are just not for me. I do better with small goals where I can always go above and beyond if I feel like it.


What are you reading this month?

Do you use a TBR or a mood reader?

SignOff12:17

Tumblr Twitter | Instagram | Goodreads

TBR

Reading Challenge | #ReadersCrossing

Reading Challenge

So, I have been really into the game Animal Crossing: Pocket Camp since I first downloaded it. So when I saw AENTEE post this challenge on twitter, I had to join in right away. If you would like to sign up here is the link: #ReadersCrossing Sign Up Post.

The “Rules”:

I say it in parenthesis because this is a very laid back challenge.

  • Runs Sunday 10/December to Sunday 31/December in your time zone
  • You play based upon a bingo board, pictured below.
  • To get a bingo you need one of the following Cute, Sporty, Cool, and Natural. For more details check out the sign up post.
  • You level up by reading books, any book is 2pts own voices are 3pts. There are a few ways to get bonus pts outlined by Aentee.

SignOff12:17


At this time I am unsure of what I am going to read, so stay tuned for updates on my twitter and instagram account!

Here is my ID Card:


Are you going to join this challenge? Do you play animal crossing?

Sign Off

Tumblr Twitter | Instagram | Goodreads