Reviews

Book Review | The Existence of Amy by Lana Grace Riva

*Book given by author in exchange for an honest review*

The Existence Of Amy

Description: 

Amy has a normal life. That is, if you were to go by a definition of ‘no immediate obvious indicators of peculiarity’, and you didn’t know her very well. She has good friends, a good job, a nice enough home. This normality, however, is precariously plastered on top of a different life. A life that is Amy’s real life. The only one her brain will let her lead. 


What I Liked

I would like to start this review out by saying I don’t normally accept review requests directly from authors very often, but reading the email with the description of this book that landed in my inbox, I knew I would break my personal rule so I can read and review it. Mental health is something that needs to be talked about and normalized in general, but also the fact that mental health can affect everyone differently and at different times in your life. I felt that this book was a very honest exploration of how mental health can impact you at a later point in life.

I though the authors choice to tell this story in the first person was a very good decision because the reader can see how not only mental health can affect them, but also how they are mad at themselves or frustrated because they really want to do something, but they just can’t. Also, one of the more notable things throughout this book was the narrator/main character understanding why others are mad or sick of them. It was heart breaking and something I have witness through friends and loved ones.

Like I said earlier in this review, mental health is varied and different for each person, but I really felt that this book was a very well done piece of literature that demonstrated how negative mental health can feel to the individual. The book talked about the good days and the bad, which I appreciated because that it a realistic view in m opinion. Mental health can be great one day, bad the next, and maybe neutral for a few days in between. I don’t cry very often, but I teared up quite a few times throughout this book because hearing this persons struggle in their own words was powerful, but also how they viewed their effect on those around them.


What I Didn’t Like

Honestly, nothing. I thought this was a wonderful written book on a very personal subject. Not everyone experiences positive or negative mental health the same way.


Overall Thoughts

Overall, I felt that this was a very well done book. It can be hard to read emotionally and may be triggering for some. But, I do recommended it if you feel comfortable reading about this content. I felt that the material was handed well, the writing itself was great. I felt the pacing was on point and it felt like there was a purpose for everything the author added to the book. I also feel like this book would be good for someone who had a hard time understanding how negative mental health can affect someone because they are not experiencing it themselves.

Here is a list of mental health hotlines for around the world, checkpointorg.com. I am not familiar with any of these personally and I not a mental health professional so I cannot speak to all of their quality, but I wanted to share this resource incase anyone needs it.


Author Links


Book Information

Publication Date: August 2, 2019

Publisher: Independently Published

List Price: $8.50

ISBN: 978-1086835816

Pages: 283 pages


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Hauls & Unboxings

Book of the Month | December 2020

Hello and welcome to my BOTM unboxing. This month I ended up choosing two books instead of the standard one book. They really are starting to make it harder and harder to just pick one book because their choices have improved dramatically from when I first subscribed. Anyway, on to the books I picked!

The Books

The Office of Historical Corracerections by Danielle Evans

Evans zooms in on particular moments and relationships in her characters’ lives in a way that allows them to speak to larger issues of race, culture, and history. She introduces us to Black and multiracial characters who are experiencing the universal confusions of lust and love, and getting walloped by grief—all while exploring how history haunts us, personally and collectively. Ultimately, she provokes us to think about the truths of American history—about who gets to tell them, and the cost of setting the record straight. –goodreads.com

This Close to Okay by Leesa Cross-Smith

On a rainy October night in Kentucky, recently divorced therapist Tallie Clark is on her way home from work when she spots a man precariously standing on the side of a bridge. Without a second thought, Tallie pulls over and jumps out of the car into the pouring rain. She convinces the man to join her for a cup of coffee, and he eventually agrees to come back to her house, where he finally shares his name: Emmett.

Over the course of the emotionally charged weekend that follows, Tallie makes it her mission to provide a safe space for Emmett, though she hesitates to confess that this is also her day job. But what she doesn’t realize is that he’s not the only one who needs healing — and she’s not the only one with secrets. –goodreads.com


Why I Picked These Books

The main reason I decided to pick The Office of Historical Corrections was due to the focus on relationships. As of late I have really been enjoying books that seemed to focus on relationships between characters to tells a larger story that is larger than the characters as well as the readers. I feel like it is more impactful and I make more connections between the story and other moments in my life, whether that be to another story or something in my own life.

As for This Close to Okay, the same is particular the reason. The main characters seem like they are going to make a strong connection to one another which will lead to very impactful dialog. I also have been in the mood to read a book where a single moment is a turning point for a character.


What was the most recent book added to your TBR?
Do these books sound interesting to you?

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Hauls & Unboxings

BOTM Unboxing | November 2019

Unboxing

Hello and welcome to another BOTM unboxing. This month I actually had a very hard time picking between two of the books  this month. I ended to just adding the two books to my box because I was going back and fourth for two days and I really could not decide. Anyway, here are the books I picked for my BOTM box this month.


So, in the past I have read Susannah Cahalan’s first book Brain on Fire, I really fell in love with her ability to tell a story. I knew she was a journalist and a writer, but I was never sure she was going to write again. Lo and behold, I sign into Book of the Month’s and saw she wrote another. I needed to pick it as my book, no if ands or butts. Honestly, if you have not read her first book, I highly recommend it. It is her own account of her brain turning against her and how she was able to gain back her life. It is really heart wrenching, raw, and fascinating. I can only guess that this will be just as good of not better.

The second book I picked was Ninth House by Leigh Bardugo. I really excited so see what she does with an adult novel. I have read some of her other books and really enjoyed them so I know she is an author I “get along with”. I have heard that there are some trigger warnings with this one, but I don’t know the particulars.

Overall, I am really excited by both of these books and I am so happy to have them on my TBR!


Have you read either of these books? What did you think?

Are either of them on your TBR?

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